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Dr. Hanley is an emeritus professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of Calgary. He obtained his MD from the University of Toronto and residency training at Foothills Hospital in Calgary (Internal Medicine and Endocrinology), followed by a research fellowship in the endocrinology of calcium metabolism at Michael Reese Medical Centre in Chicago. He is a past chair of Osteoporosis Canada’s Scientific Advisory Council, and a past president of the Canadian Society of Endocrinology and Metabolism. Current research interests are in the area of high-resolution bone imaging and conducting a clinical trial of high-dose vitamin D effects on bone.
 

Dr. Kendler is a professor of endocrinology at the University of British Columbia. He did his training at the University of Toronto with subsequent endocrinology training at the University of British Columbia and City University in New York. He directs Prohealth which is one of the largest osteoporosis clinical trials sites in North America. He is a past president of the International Society for Clinical Densitometry. He serves on the Committee of Scientific Advisors of the International Osteoporosis Foundation and is on the Scientific Advisory Committee of Osteoporosis Canada.

Dr. Harris is a board-certified internist and endocrinologist with a subspecialty focus on osteoporosis, metabolic bone disease and disorders of mineral metabolism. He received his medical degree from the University of California, San Francisco, and completed a residency and chief residency in Internal Medicine at the same institution. He completed a clinical and research fellowship in Endocrinology and Metabolism at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. In 1983, he returned to the University of California, San Francisco, where he is a Clinical Professor of Medicine. Dr. Harris has spent many years working on a variety of clinical research projects to examine the effects of nutrition, calcium supplements, vitamin D, hormone therapy, bisphosphonates, calcitonin, PTH and SERMs upon the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Dr. Harris maintains an active consultative practice in metabolic bone disease, but is also engaged in a wide variety of educational initiatives related to osteoporosis.

Dr. Lewiecki Director of New Mexico Clinical Research & Osteoporosis Center and Director of Bone Health TeleECHO at University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center in Albuquerque, NM. His is a consultant in osteoporosis and metabolic bone disease, supervisor of bone densitometry at his center, and educator with a special interest in the management of osteoporosis and metabolic bone disease. He is principal investigator for the center’s osteoporosis clinical trials and author of numerous scientific publications on osteoporosis and bone densitometry. He is past-president of the International Society for Clinical Densitometry and currently a board member of the ISCD, National Osteoporosis Foundation, and Osteoporosis Foundation of New Mexico.

Dr. Dian is a Clinical professor in the Division of Geriatric Medicine at University of British Columbia. He did his MD. training at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa, with subsequent training at University of British Columbia and University of California, Los Angeles. He is past head of the division of Geriatric Medicine at U.B.C., The Osteoporosis Clinic at B.C. Women’s Hospital and is currently head of the Fall and Fracture Prevention Clinic at Vancouver General Hospital. He currently serves on the Scientific Advisory Committee of Osteoporosis Canada.

Dr. McClung is widely known as an educator, translating clinical research information into practical strategies of evaluation and treatment for other physicians. Dr. McClung is internationally recognized expert in the fields of osteoporosis and bone density testing. He is the founding director of the Oregon Osteoporosis Center. His Center has been involved in many of the important clinical studies that resulted in the availability of the medications now used to treat osteoporosis and Paget’s disease of bone. He has published more than 200 papers and book chapters, is co-editor of a book for clinicians about disorders of bone and mineral metabolism and is a member of the editorial boards for several journals in his field.